Category Archives: Mineral Processing

#Eramet, #Suez eye #EV battery recycling in #France by 2024

PARIS, March 16 (Reuters) – French mining group Eramet (ERMT.PA) said on Wednesday it could develop jointly with Suez a recycling facility in France for electric vehicle batteries by 2024.

Eramet, a major producer of nickel and manganese for the steel sector, has focused increasingly on materials for electric vehicles.

In addition to large mine deposits in Indonesia and Argentina, it sees recycling as contributing to its potential to cover 20% of the European Union’s nickel requirements, 25% of the bloc’s lithium needs and 12% of its cobalt demand for EV batteries by 2030.

The joint project would produce black mass, a metal concentrate containing nickel, cobalt, manganese, lithium and graphite that is suitable for hydrometallurgical refining.

Read more at: https://www.reuters.com/technology/eramet-suez-eye-ev-battery-recycling-france-by-2024-2022-03-16/

#TheWhiteHouse: FACT SHEET- Securing a Made in America Supply Chain for Critical Minerals

Biden-Harris Administration, Companies Announce Major Investments to Expand Domestic Critical Minerals Supply Chain, Breaking Dependence on China and Boosting Sustainable Practices.

Critical minerals provide the building blocks for many modern technologies and are essential to our national security and economic prosperity. These minerals—such as rare earth elements, lithium, and cobalt—can be found in products from computers to household appliances. They are also key inputs in clean energy technologies like batteries, electric vehicles, wind turbines, and solar panels. As the world transitions to a clean energy economy, global demand for these critical minerals is set to skyrocket by 400-600 percent over the next several decades, and, for minerals such as lithium and graphite used in electric vehicle (EV) batteries, demand will increase by even more—as much as 4,000 percent. The U.S. is increasingly dependent on foreign sources for many of the processed versions of these minerals. Globally, China controls most of the market for processing and refining for cobalt, lithium, rare earths and other critical minerals.

Today, President Biden will meet with Administration and state partners, industry executives, community representatives, labor leaders, and California Governor Gavin Newsom to announce major investments in domestic production of key critical minerals and materials, ensuring these resources benefit the community, and creating good-paying, union jobs in sustainable production.

Read more at: FACT SHEET: Securing a Made in America Supply Chain for Critical Minerals | The White House

#Blockchain #RareEarth scheme to certify sustainable output for EVs

LONDON, Feb 8 (Reuters) – An EU-funded certification scheme using blockchain is being developed for rare earths as automakers demand proof that materials used to make magnets for electric vehicles (EVs) are not linked to toxic pollution.

The system will set global standards and give confidence to consumers demanding sustainable products, two of the organisers told Reuters ahead of an official announcement on Tuesday.

The Circular System for Assessing Rare Earth Sustainability or CSyARES is due to be ready in about three years, the Rare Earth Industry Association (REIA) and Dutch supply chain traceability firm Circularise said.

Read more at: Blockchain rare earth scheme to certify sustainable output for EVs | Reuters

#Tesla vs #Volkswagen vs #BYD – battery power, #Lithium, #Nickel, #Cobalt use

Tesla holds a wide lead. Tesla lectures in Paris, 1892. Stock image

Tesla deployed 27% of the world’s battery nickel, despite the fact that overall LFP accounts for more than a quarter of the kWh hours in all of its vehicles sold last year. Tesla still does not sell LFP-powered models in North America.  

Despite selling half the number of BEVs than Tesla, thanks to the absence of LFP in its line-up, Volkswagen deployed more cobalt and on a relative basis more metals across its brands. That’s in part due to high-performance vehicles like the Porsche Taycan and Audi e-tron, some of which come equipped with higher nickel NCM batteries where cobalt can represent up to 20% of the metal mix. 

Read more at: CHARTS: Tesla v Volkswagen v BYD – battery power, lithium, nickel, cobalt use – MINING.COM

#Ottawa looks on as #China buys #Canadian #Lithium operations

Efforts to strengthen Canada’s supply chains for critical minerals were undermined last week when our own government decided not to conduct a national security review into the purchase of a Canadian lithium producer by a Chinese state-owned enterprise.

The decision is bizarre. Lithium, which is on a list of 31 minerals that Ottawa says are critical to Canada’s economy, is imperative to modern manufacturing, including large-scale battery storage needed for clean energy transition and, significantly, batteries for the flourishing electric vehicle (EV) industry.

Now the Zijin Mining Group Ltd is cleared to buy Toronto-based Neo Lithium Corp.

China is establishing global dominance of high-tech manufacturing, including EVs, by having state-owned enterprises acquire foreign intellectual property, technologies and assets. Securing access to critical minerals is essential to that mission.

Read more at: Ottawa looks on as China buys Canadian lithium operations | The Star

How The #US Is Losing The #Lithium Industry To #China

In the early days of the oil industry, the U.S. quickly established dominance as the world’s most important producer and consumer of petroleum. But over time, depletion in the U.S. and discoveries abroad caused U.S. dominance of the petroleum industry to fade.

The U.S. received a rare second chance to regain energy independence as a result of the shale oil boom. But the lessons we have learned over the evolution of the oil industry have direct implications as the world transitions to new sources of energy.

Petroleum was the raw material that enabled the growth of the global transportation industry over the past century. But increasingly in the next century, it is lithium that will be the critical commodity. U.S. automakers aspire to have 40% to 50% of new vehicle sales by 2030 be electric vehicles (EVs). This will result in a tremendous increase in lithium consumption

It is estimated that the U.S. alone will need 500,000 metric tons per year of unrefined lithium by 2034 just to power EVs. The U.S. produces just a fraction of that today. The current global production of lithium in 2020 was about 440,000 metric tons of lithium carbonate equivalent (LCE, contains about 18% of pure lithium), and not all of that is in pure enough form for batteries.

But just as the U.S. eventually ceded its petroleum security to foreign countries, it is in the process of doing the same with lithium. According to the 2021 BP Statistical Review, China has 7.9% of the world’s lithium reserves. The U.S. has 4.0%. (The majority of global lithium reserves are in South America and Australia). Nevertheless, China has become the 3rd largest lithium producer in the world, outproducing the U.S. in 2020 by more than a factor of 15.

This dominance didn’t happen by accident. Over the past decade, China has spent over $60 billion to build its lithium industry. U.S. investments have lagged significantly behind, which has enabled China to build a robust lithium supply chain.

Read more at: https://www.forbes.com/sites/rrapier/2022/01/11/the-us-is-losing-the-lithium-industry-to-china/?sh=48a63da16a15

#Nasdaq: Tesla signs deal for first #US #Nickel supply with #TalonMetals

Talon Metals plans to use technology it hopes will allow it to suck carbon dioxide out of the atmosphere and chemically bind it – and thus permanently store it – to rocks found inside its Tamarack project in northern Minnesota. The process, which is still being tested, would effectively let Talon market nickel as carbon neutral, a huge appeal for Musk and Tesla.

Read more at: https://www.nasdaq.com/articles/tesla-signs-deal-for-first-u.s.-nickel-supply-with-talon-metals

#BBC Future: #Lithium batteries’ big unanswered question

“The current method of simply shredding everything and trying to purify a complex mixture results in expensive processes with low value products,” says Andrew Abbott, a physical chemist at the University of Leicester. As a result, it costs more to recycle them than to mine more lithium to make new ones. Also, since large scale, cheap ways to recycle Li batteries are lagging behind, only about 5% of Li batteries are recycled globally, meaning the majority are simply going to waste.

But as demand for EVs escalates, as it’s projected to, the impetus to recycle more of them is set to barrel through the battery and motor vehicle industry.

The current shortcomings in Li battery recycling isn’t the only reason they are an environmental strain. Mining the various metals needed for Li batteries requires vast resources. It takes 500,000 gallons (2,273,000 litres) of water to mine one tonne of lithium. In Chile’s Atacama Salt Flats, lithium mining has been linked to declining vegetation, hotter daytime temperatures and increasing drought conditions in national reserve areas. So even though EVs may help reduce carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions over their lifetime, the battery that powers them starts its life laden with a large environmental footprint.

We can no longer treat the batteries as disposable – Shirley Meng

If the millions upon millions of Li batteries that will give out after around 10 years or so of use   are recycled more efficiently, however, it will help neutralise all that energy expenditure. Several labs have been working on refining more efficient recycling methods so that, eventually, a standardised, eco-friendly way to recycle Li batteries will be ready to meet skyrocketing demand.

“We have to find ways to make it enter what we call a circular lifecycle, because the lithium and the cobalt and nickel take a lot of electricity and a lot of effort to be mined and refined and made into the batteries. We can no longer treat the batteries as disposable,” says Shirley Meng, professor in energy technologies at the University of California, San Diego.

Read more at: Lithium batteries’ big unanswered question – BBC Future

#Vale Aims To Transform Misfiring Metals Division To Win Business Of #Tesla

Vale is greatest generally known as one of many world’s largest producers of iron ore from its sprawling Brazilian operations — however its chief government desires to alter that.

For Eduardo Bartolomeo, being seen as a “one geography, one mineral firm” is harmful and Vale must be attempting to spotlight the worth of its industrial metals enterprise, which he says has the potential to be a key provider of battery supplies to the North American automotive.

Attaining that can be no straightforward activity. To provide Tesla, Ford, Normal Motors and others with the required copper, nickel and cobalt to scale up manufacturing of electrical autos, Bartolomeo should rework the efficiency of the misfiring metals division.

“We predict we might be the provider alternative,” Bartolomeo instructed the Monetary Occasions throughout a latest go to to London to satisfy traders. “However we have to produce. We have to get the manufacturing up. That’s basic. Then we have to get the reserves and sources.

He has already made one decisive transfer, changing the top of the enterprise, Mark Travers, with Deshnee Naidoo, a former government at India’s Vedanta Assets.

However that is only a first step after, by his personal admission, one other difficult 12 months for the division in 2021, with a labour dispute in Canada, a fireplace on the Solobo copper mine and a short lived halt of nickel manufacturing at its Onca Puma challenge in Brazil. On high of that, 39 staff have been rescued after being trapped within the underground Totten mine in Ontario.

Whereas output is forecast to get well subsequent 12 months, Bartolomeo, who ran the base-metals enterprise earlier than he was appointed chief executive in April 2019, is aware of there may be plenty of work to do if Vale is to fulfil its ambition of capturing 30-40 per cent of the North American marketplace for battery-grade nickel in 5 years.

“We’re speaking to Ford, GM, we’re speaking to all of them,” he mentioned, mentioning that Vale had already struck a deal to promote 5 per cent of its annual highest-grade Class 1 nickel output to a US carmaker, broadly rumoured to be Tesla. A typical electric-vehicle battery pack wants about 35 kilogrammes of nickel, in response to the IMF, whereas charging stations require substantial quantities of copper.

Read more at: https://uk.universalpersonality.com/market/vale-aims-to-transform-misfiring-metals-division-to-win-business-of-tesla/

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